Volume 29, No.1

Fall 2014

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  • Black Like Me

    By Renée Watson

    A poem—and the history behind it—about being invisible, yet stereotyped, as an African American student bused to a predominantly white school.

  • Dear White Teacher

    By Chrysanthius Lathan

    An African American middle school teacher calls on white teachers to think before they routinely send black children to black teachers when there is a problem.

  • Queridos maestros blancos

    By Chrysanthius Lathan

    Una maestra afroamericana de secundaria les pide a los maestros blancos que piensen antes de mandarles los niños negros a los maestros negros cada vez que tengan un problema con ellos.

  • Teaching the N-Word

    By Michelle Kenney

    A white high school teacher prepares her students to read August Wilson’s Fences by leading an exploration of the n-word.

  • Rocketship to Profits

    Silicon Valley breeds corporate reformers with national reach

    By David Bacon

    Rocketship Education, a rapidly expanding charter school chain, shows what happens when the rich control our schools.

  • “Aren’t You on the Parent Listserv?”

    Working for equitable family involvement in a dual-immersion elementary school

    By Grace Cornell Gonzales

    A kindergarten teacher tries to change the power imbalance between Spanish- and English-speaking parents in her classroom and school.

  • ¿No estás registrado en la lista de correos electrónicos?

    By Grace Cornell Gonzales

    Una maestra de kínder intenta cambiar el balance de poder entre los padres hispanohablantes y angloparlantes en su salón y su escuela.

  • The Military Invasion of My High School

    The role of JROTC

    By Sylvia McGauley

    A high school teacher describes the problematic impact of the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps at her school.

  • Restorative Justice

    What it is and is not

    By The editors of Rethinking Schools

    Misbehave, get punished. That pretty much sums up the approach to “disciplining” students that educators through the decades have taken in schools and classrooms. The most extreme form of this law-and-order strategy is zero tolerance, described in Rethinking Schools by Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn back in 2000, as these policies gained popularity: Schools everywhere—public, […]

  • The Children of Gaza

    Like millions around the world, Rethinking Schools editors have been horrified and angered by Israel’s assault on the Palestinian people of Gaza. Of the more than 2,100 Palestinians killed, the vast majority civilians, more than 500 have been children. The images of Israeli bombs destroying hospitals, homes, and schools are devastating—indiscriminate killing by weapons whose […]

  • Check out these valuable resources, reviewed by Rethinking Schools editors and Teaching for Change colleagues. 29.1

    Picture Books Soccer Star By Mina JavaherbinIllustrated by Renato Alarco(Candlewick, 2014)40 pp. Young Paulo Marcelo Feliciano, who works on a fishing boat, introduces the reader to his friends. They all work at various jobs to help their families, and they all love soccer. The story and the luminous illustrations by Renato Alarc‹o present the challenges […]

  • When Girls Are Activists

    By Elizabeth Marshall

    Child and teen activists fighting for social justice often get left out of official histories and curriculum. In their picture book biography, Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Makers’ Strike of 1909, Michelle Markel and Melissa Sweet fill one of those gaps. The book chronicles the life of Jewish immigrant Clara Lemlich, who led the […]